By Natasha Rawat

Looking for some spice in your regular reading list then we have put together a list of five fiction books, across different genres, that will revive your flavor if you’re looking for a change !

Get, Set, Going, Folks!

 

1.Daughter of Smoke and Bone – Laini Taylor

Genre-Fantasy

Wishes are false. Hope is true. Hope makes its own magic.”

Seventeen-year-old Karou leads a double life, trying to strike a balance between our world and Elsewhere. When the mysterious scorched handprints start severing the portal to the other side, Karou must ultimately decide between the safety of the human world and the dangers of Elsewhere.

The vivid imagery of both Prague and Elsewhere is enough to encapsulate the readers right from the start. Indulging in the themes of love, magic, separation and a never-ending war, the novel paves the ultimate path for self-discovery of the protagonist. Hence, the book is bound to captivate the readers in its fantasy world. This is not the end, you can linger in Elsewhere after the novel ends since it is the first of the trilogy!

 

2.Gone Girl – Gillian Flynn

Genre-Thriller

“There is something disturbing about recalling a warm memory and feeling utterly cold.”

The title itself gives away the basic premise of the novel. Amy Dunne suddenly goes missing on her fifth anniversary. Things take a bad turn when Nick finds himself as the prime suspect involved in his wife’s disappearance.

The novel grips, disturbs and engrosses the reader who is set to find the clues to solve the mystery. The dual narrative puts forth both the protagonists’ perspective,adding to the tension of the plot with its slow revelations. Ultimately, the reader is faced with the dilemma as to whom to believe. The surprises and the plot-twists will make the readers anticipate the ending and well, the ending itself will compel you to skim through the pages again.

 

3.And Then There Were None – Agatha Christie

Genre-Murder Mystery

“One little soldier boy left all alone; he went and hanged himself. And then there were none.”

Ten strangers are invited to the isolated ‘Soldier Island’ by a mysterious and unknown U.N. Owen. Over dinner a record begins to play, accusing each one of having committed a heinous crime. One by one, the visitors are murdered in a way that resembles the pattern of the framed nursery rhyme hung in the house. It gets interesting when they realize that the murderer is amidst them and will strike again.

Christie weaves an intricate plot and deftly presents her characters. One is forced to suspect every single person as the potential murderer. However, the tight-knitted plot does not reveal the real murderer. This whodunit novel is a must read for anyone craving a murder-mystery filled with suspense and the thrill of the revelation of the murderer.

 

4.Animal Farm – George Orwell

Genre-Allegory

“All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others.”

The maltreatment of the animals by Mr. Jones of Manor Farm leads to an uprising against him. The farm is soon named as ‘Animal Farm’ for egalitarian purposes. However, as time passes, the now corrupted beliefs of the rebellion makes us realize that some animals are more equal than others.

The narration of the plot is not fancy. It works as an allegory of the Russian Revolution. Orwell deals with the metamorphism of a freedom struggle to a chaos caused by the dynamics of power. While also dealing with the themes of propaganda, illiteracy and dictatorship, Orwell portrays the catastrophe which is inflicted by the greed of power.

 

5.Brave New World – Aldous Huxley

Genre-Dystopian

“But I don’t want comfort. I want god, I want poetry. I want real danger, I want freedom, I want goodness, I want sin.”

Set in the futuristic world, Huxley creates a utopian society in which babies are conditioned, physically and chemically, and then psychologically after birth. Everyone conforms to the society in which there are no painful emotions but blind happiness.

One soon realizes that the utopia ‘Brave New World’ creates is a bleak one. It warns to the potential dangers of science and technology and how it can produce a horrible society. A society in which everyone appears to be satisfied but that comes at the cost of personal freedom and loss of identity.

 

Natasha Rawat is a Staff Writer at TTV and studies English Literature at Deen Dayal Upadhyaya College, DU.

2 COMMENTS

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